Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation

  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

 

IMMIGRANT VOICES

 

Learn How to Create your Story
Stories by Immigrant's Last Name

        
Sort stories by 


Marbach, Flora and Lizzy : Flora Sara Marbach, 50, and Lizzy Marbach, 12:Fleeing Hitler’s Germany for a new life in America by Erika Alvarez
Year of Arrival 1940

By late spring 1940, Hitler’s armies had roared through and conquered the Netherlands, Belgium, and Luxembourg. Paris was next to topple, in June 1940, when Flora Marbach was awaiting a visa to flee Vienna, Germany. A Jew, and a widow since 1937, Flora must have found the early days of the Third Reich terrible, especially after the government abruptly confiscated her husband’s textile factory and left her without any compensation. She managed to survive on some money of her own and her husband’s insurance, but she knew that as Jews, she and her twelve-year-old daughter, Lizzy, would have no future in a German-occupied Europe. They had to get out, but how??

Read More

 

Marill, Alfred and Klara : From the National Archives’ Angel Island files - One Family’s Story: Alfred Israel Marill and Klara Elizabeth Sara Marill by Lakhpreet "Preeti" Gill
Year of Arrival 1940

Editor's note: Shortly after we posted the profile of Alfred and Klara Marrill, AIISF was contacted by Richard Kobayashi, who is the grandson of Alfred and Klara Marill.  His mother is Alice Marill Kobayashi, who journeyed to the U.S. a year before her parents came through Angel Island.  Richard’s sister Carol  read the profile online and Richard very graciously sent us his grandfather’s detailed account of their journey from Vienna to Angel Island in 1940. Read Alfred's Journal below.

 

Matsuzawa, Atsushi and Kanae  : The Matsuzawas: Nisei Marye Kimoto Remembers Her Family and Its Angel Island Experiences by Nancy F. Fong
Year of Arrival 1911

At 87 and living in Culver City, CA, Marye Kimoto fondly looked back on the lives of her family, which included her issei parents who were first generation Japanese immigrants, as well as her younger sister Bessie and herself, nisei who were the American born children of issei.

Read More

   

Ming, Jenny Gar-Yee Jang : Fate and the importance of remembering where you came from: The Jenny Ming story by Eva Martinez
Year of Arrival 1964

based on an interview of Jenny Ming by Eddie Wong

In 1955, after waiting for their third child to be born, the Jang family left their home in communist-ruled Canton, China, for the relative safety of Macau.  Macau had been under Portuguese rule since 1887 and the newly established Beijing government was temporarily ignoring the region.

Read More

 

Monsef, Marcie  : From Tehran to California by Emily T Harris
Year of Arrival 1967

I’ve known Marcie Monsef, or rather she has known me, since my birth. In fact, we share a name: Marzieh, her legal name, is my middle name. Marcie is my stepfather’s mother and has always been an important part of my life.

Read More

   

Moy, Damon : My Father, Damon Moy by Diane Lo
Year of Arrival 1940

A longtime resident in Sacramento,CA, Mr. Damon Moy immigrated to the U.S. in 1940 and was detained on Angel Island for three months.  After a long career in the food service industry, he and his wife Helen retired in Honolulu where their children now reside.

Read More

 

Nakamura, Mantsuchi and Sojuro : Mantsuchi and Sojuro Nakamura: Japanese Immigrant Farmers in California’s Central Valley by Grant Din
Year of Arrival 1900

The story of the Nakamura brothers of Japan and Reedley, California, is an example of the challenges many Japanese immigrants faced in the U.S. After many challenges, they were both able to establish farming businesses and raise families, only to find their worlds torn apart shortly after Pearl Harbor when both were arrested and sent to a temporary detention center called Sharp Park, near Pacifica, CA. Older brother Mantsuchi was then sent to Fort McDowell at Angel Island and then to Lordsburg and Santa Fe, New Mexico before finally being reunited with his family at Poston, Arizona, while younger brother Sojuro was reunited with his family earlier at Poston, avoiding the U.S. Army and Department of Justice camps where Mantsuchi was sent. For more information on the use of Angel Island to house Japanese detainees, visit our webpage.

Read More

   

Nakamura, Kiyoye : Kiyoye Nakamura: Picture Bride by Tene Woo Kember
Year of Arrival 1918

Editor's note: After we posted Tene’s article, we received inquiries about the status of Kiyoye Nakamura. Did we know if she was able to land in the United States (this information for some reason was not in her file)? We did some more research and found the good news that it appears that the Nakamuras were listed in the 1930 census in Vacaville, California, with a three year old son, but the sad news that Kiyoye passed away of cancer in Vacaville in 1937. We also found a ship log showing Toragusu returning to the U.S. in 1940, with no listing for his son and can only speculate that he brought his son back to Japan to be raised.

Read More

 

Ng, Lit : The Adventures of Lit Ng by Roy Chan
Year of Arrival 1939

“In my life, I feel so fortunate. Even if you don't have an education, you still could make it here in the United States. I made it. If I can make it, other people can too.” - Lit Ng

Read More

   

Nikonenko, Paul and Mary : The Nikonenkos: Married at Sea on the Way to Angel Island by Eugenia Bailey
Year of Arrival 1923

Read More

 

Ohashi, Mihi Endo : Reflections from the grandson of a Japanese picture bride by Glenn Osaka
Year of Arrival 1912

Read More

   

Ong, Yet Nam : From Hoiping to Stanford by Roy Chan
Year of Arrival 1901

Ong Yet Nam was the first born son of Ong Yip Doy and Seto Shee. He was born in 1886 in rural Doung Moon Lei Village, Wu Lung, Hoiping, Guangdung, China, and died at the age of 43 in a tragic boating accident on the Pearl River in Canton, China

Read More

 

Ozaki, Otokichi (Muin) : Angel Island was one of Eight Detention Centers for Otokichi Ozaki by Grant Din
Year of Arrival 1904

Family Torn Apart, edited by Gail Honda, tells the story of Otokichi Ozaki from Hilo on the Big Island of Hawaiˋi. It is based on letters, poetry and radio scripts in the collection of the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaiˋi. Ozaki was a Japanese language school teacher, tanka poet, anthurium grower and a leader of the Japanese community in Hilo on the Big Island of Hawaiˋi. He spent a little over a week on Angel Island in March and April of 1942.

Read More

   

Page 8 of 12

Join our e-news list